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Borzoi. In movie, Q & A, Intelligence, Is Family Dog, With Kids, Amount Of Shedding

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Borzoi in the cinema. Borzoi have appeared in films such as. Dumb and Dumber
1994 102 Dalmatians
2000 The Hunger Games
2012 Anna Karenina
2012 Chaplin
1992 Just Around the Corner
1938 The Three Musketeers
1973 War and peace
1965 The Kiss
1929 Breed standards may change over time. Both appearance standards and standards regarding
breed character or working qualities may change. The works of art of the early years depict
the most typical representatives of the breeds of that time. Comparing with the modern appearance of the
breed, you will be able to assess how much the breed has changed over time. Also of interest are archival photographs
of specific breeds, which you can find on the Internet in specialized forums about the
breed. Historical reference of the breed and subgroup. The whole appearance of a beautiful and graceful
Russian greyhound testifies to a swift run; all parts of the dog are impeccably honed,
the lines are complete. The outlines of the body are beautiful, the
muscles are well developed. The head is long, narrow, with a slightly
domed skull. The coat is long, silky, not curly, lying
close to the body and wavy.

Height at the withers from 71 to 79 centimeters,
weight from 34 to 48 kilograms. The color is varied, predominantly white. The proportionality and aesthetics of the
forms of the Russian canine greyhound did not serve as the main criteria for its breeding. First of all, it is a fast, strong, fearless
and thinking dog, capable of taking on a wolf, a dangerous and formidable opponent. The Russian greyhound was as highly valued
by the royal family in Russia as the Greyhounds were at the royal court in England. Wolf hunting has become traditional in Russia,
and canine greyhounds became famous for their masterful work on this beast.

A pair of fast and hardy greyhounds could
take on a wolf. Grabbing him by the scruff of the neck and
pressing him to the ground, the greyhounds waited for the hunter to approach. In England and other countries, Russian greyhounds
were no longer used for hunting wolves, they were bred for their extraordinary beauty. These dogs have become an exquisite accessory
of wealthy houses and favorites in the show ring. The Russian greyhound is a beautiful and refined
dog, but it cannot be considered ideal for any lifestyle: it needs a lot of space and
long walks, only in this case you can be sure of its uniqueness.

Borzoi is balanced and restrained. Borzoi gives the impression of a bunch of
energy, strength and health. This is an amazingly beautiful and graceful
dog. Russian canine sedate and majestic dog, far
from ideal for playing with children. These dogs need to move a lot, but do not
forget that this is a born hunter and can only run free away from pets. Borzoi is used to catch an animal such as
a hare, a fox, a wolf, in open, steppe, desert or field lands. She has vigilance, great agility, viciousness
towards the beast, strength and a sharp throw at the time of the capture of the beast. This is a hunting dog known in Russia since
the 11th century. We have little reliable material at our disposal
to trace the formation of this breed in the past. The few historically reliable images that
give us information about the former Russian greyhounds date back to 1550.

Three dogs accompanying the Grand Duke of
Moscow on a pilgrimage are depicted in an old breviary. They already show the typical signs of Russian
Borzois: elongated, narrow heads, small ears, sickle-shaped tails. What breeds could form the basis of the breed,
a topic that gives rise to various theories, which, however, have not yet given any satisfactory
answer. The first descriptions of the breed date back
to the 17th century, they give an idea of ​​​​dogs similar to the current greyhounds,
which were used when hunting game. At the beginning of the 18th century, the
blood of English greyhounds brought to Russia from Western Europe, horty, broad-haired greyhounds,
and, starting from the 20s of the 19th century, eastern greyhounds, rushed to the Russian
greyhounds. As a result, a wide variety of types of this
breed has appeared. Only after 1888, when the first standard was
adopted, did the formation of the modern Russian canine greyhound begin. No other breed, over the centuries, has been
in the process of its formation, development and improvement in such close connection with
the changing history of its country of origin as Borzoi. Tsarism, the brilliant and carefree life of
Russian princes and large landowners were the scenery against which Russian hunting
with greyhounds acquired such a unique character.

Around 1650, a book dedicated to Tsar Alexei
Mikhailovich appeared about hunting with greyhounds and a description of their distinguishing
features. Noble nobles and landowners, passionate fans
of dog hunting, had packs of hundreds of hunting dogs, which were looked after by an entire
army of kennels. Complete dog hunts took place with the participation
of a huge number of horse hunters, beaters and hounds. Then the greyhounds, who were often released
in packs, did direct work with the wolf and other animals.

The abolition of serfdom in 1861 was the first
blow that greatly undermined the then breeding of Russian canine greyhounds. The absence of a free labor force did not
allow, with the same extravagance, to maintain and use a huge number of packs of greyhounds. Approximately 90 percent of hunts ceased to
exist. passionate fans of dog hunting, had packs
of hundreds of hunting dogs, which were looked after by an entire army of kennels. Complete dog hunts took place with the participation
of a huge number of horse hunters, beaters and hounds. Then the greyhounds, who were often released
in packs, did direct work with the wolf and other animals. The abolition of serfdom in 1861 was the first
blow that greatly undermined the then breeding of Russian canine greyhounds. The absence of a free labor force did not
allow, with the same extravagance, to maintain and use a huge number of packs of greyhounds.

Approximately 90 percent of hunts ceased to
exist. passionate fans of dog hunting, had packs
of hundreds of hunting dogs, which were looked after by an entire army of kennels. Complete dog hunts took place with the participation
of a huge number of horse hunters, beaters and hounds. Then the greyhounds, who were often released
in packs, did direct work with the wolf and other animals. The abolition of serfdom in 1861 was the first
blow that greatly undermined the then breeding of Russian canine greyhounds. The absence of a free labor force did not
allow, with the same extravagance, to maintain and use a huge number of packs of greyhounds. Approximately 90 percent of hunts ceased to
exist. Then the greyhounds, who were often released
in packs, did direct work with the wolf and other animals. The abolition of serfdom in 1861 was the first
blow that greatly undermined the then breeding of Russian canine greyhounds.

The absence of a free labor force did not
allow, with the same extravagance, to maintain and use a huge number of packs of greyhounds. Approximately 90 percent of hunts ceased to
exist. Then the greyhounds, who were often released
in packs, did direct work with the wolf and other animals. The abolition of serfdom in 1861 was the first
blow that greatly undermined the then breeding of Russian canine greyhounds. The absence of a free labor force did not
allow, with the same extravagance, to maintain and use a huge number of packs of greyhounds. Approximately 90 percent of hunts ceased to
exist. By this time Borzoi was not yet a complete
portrait of the breed. In old Russia, by 1860, at least 10 original
types were known. The “Imperial Society for the Propagation
of Hunting Dogs”, founded in 1873 in Moscow, took up this problem, which annually held
a large exhibition. Efforts were concentrated on a single preferred
type, and in 1888 its features became the basis of the first official standard. Until now, the typical exterior is guided
by this standard. After the October Revolution, only the nascent
breeding selection received a second blow, which led to a significant reduction in the
number of dogs, since along with the aristocracy and its way of life, the Russian greyhound,
brought to perfection, disappeared in Russia.

But at this time in Europe and America, the
breed has already found its second home. In Germany, breeding began around 1890. In 1892, two greyhound clubs outside of Russia
were founded, namely the Berlin Russian Greyhound Club and one in England. In 1903, the opening of the club in the USA
followed. The basis of Western European breeding was
primarily laid by the import of Russian greyhounds in the period before the First World War from
the famous Pershino factory of Grand Duke Nikolai Nikolayevich. This factory, where it was possible to fuse
the most diverse initial types of greyhounds into one ideal type, became the guide for
the successful breeding of Russian greyhounds outside of Russia.

However, the standard for the Russian Borzoi,
which has been valid in Western Europe since 1925 within the competence of the FCI, was
established by Russian emigrants, Russian greyhound experts Boldarev and Counts Sheremetevs. Western European reproduction has preserved
all external features in the breed, even brought them to perfection. At the same time, the breed is still quite
far removed from its original purpose. In the 20s and 30s of the 20th century, there
was a kind of fashion for the Russian greyhound, when they saw it as more of a decorative dog
than a typical greyhound. The Russian greyhound was advertised in every
way as a "lady's dog". This had a bad effect on the independent,
courageous character of the former wolf hunter; outside of Russia, she was always valued solely
for her beauty. In Russia, after the revolution and the Second
World War, the breed was preserved on a very meager breeding base. Its survival was due to a few dog breeders
and, first of all, thanks to the Soviet state reproduction. Today, the Russian Borzoi is not only re-acknowledged
for its right to exist, but it is rediscovered as a hunting dog. She no longer hunts wolves; now it is reoriented
by professional hunters to hunting smaller fur-bearing animals, hares and foxes.

In Russia, along with the exterior, an exam
in the field is a condition for obtaining a diploma and participating in championships. From today's version of the Russian canine
greyhound, they achieved the highest hunting results, coupled with obedience and suitability
for training. From this follows the difference between the
current Western European line of Russian greyhounds and the Russian one. In Western Europe, a noble exterior is brought
to the fore. In Russia, on the contrary, the main criterion
is hunting qualities. The last time the standard was improved and
approved in 1980. From this follows the difference between the
current Western European line of Russian greyhounds and the Russian one.

In Western Europe, a noble exterior is brought
to the fore. In Russia, on the contrary, the main criterion
is hunting qualities. The last time the standard was improved and
approved in 1980. From this follows the difference between the
current Western European line of Russian greyhounds and the Russian one. In Western Europe, a noble exterior is brought
to the fore. In Russia, on the contrary, the main criterion
is hunting qualities. The last time the standard was improved and
approved in 1980. Borzoi is very attached to the family in which
she lives. Some breeds are strongly attached to one person,
others to all members of the human family, others may have a friendly attitude towards
all people in general, and the fourth may not have close ties even with the owner. Borzoi are very strongly attached to all members
of the human family in which they live.

They also react quite well to strangers, but
they are wary of them. The attitude of any dog ​​to strangers
strongly depends on the breed of the pet, but even more strongly this attitude depends
on the upbringing and socialization of a particular individual, while socialization in the early
puppyhood of a pet is especially important in this regard. At the same time, Borzoi do not get along
well with children. Regardless of the dog's friendly attitude
towards children, a dog of any breed should not be left alone with small children. Some breeds of dogs are more relaxed about
the behavior of young children and may not pay attention to some antics of children,
however, it should be understood that dogs of all breeds, no matter how friendly they
are, should be with children only under the supervision of the owner or adults, since
in addition to the qualities of the breed in relation to children, there are also the
individual characteristics of each dog, its upbringing and previous experience in communicating
with children.

Even these relationships are largely influenced
by the behavior of children. But with other dogs, Borzoi finds a common
language quite well and gets along well with them, if, of course, other dogs show similar
behavior. Different breeds of dogs treat their own kind
differently, some dogs will play and interact in every possible way with dogs they meet
or live with, other breeds may try to dominate or even attack similar four-legged ones. At the same time, the relationship between
dogs can be very different from how a dog will react to people. The behavior of a dog in relation to other
dogs and people depends not only on the breed, but also on the socialization of a particular
individual. What can not be said about small pets such
as hamsters, domestic rats, squirrels, chinchillas and other rodents.

It is better to keep this breed away from
small pets. To start a breed like the Borzoi, you'd better
have at least some dog ownership experience or take special courses that teach you how
to socialize a dog from puppyhood and give you advice on keeping a dog. Some dog breeds are easier to keep and train,
while others are more independent and even assertive and require an experienced owner. The Borzoi breed is suitable for people with
minimal experience in keeping dogs. Despite the fact that Borzoi is a hunting
dog, it is perfectly suitable for keeping in an apartment, provided that you can realize
the energy potential of your animal with regular walks, in addition, it should be borne in
mind that they cannot stand loneliness and cannot be left alone for a long time. The quality and quantity of wool allow the
Russian greyhound to comfortably endure cold and short-term heat, but very low or high
temperatures are no longer safe for the four-legged.

Active loads should be avoided in the warm
season. Learning and training. All dogs can be trained and trained, but some
breeds remember and execute commands faster and more readily than other breeds. Different breeds need a different approach
to training and education. Some breeds may appear to be poorly trainable
or even stupid, however, in most cases, a dog breed's trainability is due to the stubborn
or independent nature of the dog breed or individual. this is just the case of the Russian greyhound,
they are smart enough to understand what they want from them, but at the same time they
are just as stubborn.

Also of great importance in the trainability
of a dog is the role of what training methods the trainer uses for a particular breed. In the book The Intelligence of Dogs, published
in 1994 and written by University of British Columbia Vancouver psychology professor Stanley
Coren, Borzoi is ranked 76 out of 80 in terms of learning ability. In this regard, the breed stands next to such
breeds as the Pekingese, Bloodhound, Chow Chow, English Bulldog. In Professor Stanley Coren's book, Borzoi
is located in the group: Dogs with poor learning abilities
Mastering a new team from 80 to 100 repetitions. Execution of the command from the first time:
in 25% of cases and above. The disadvantage of this scale for learning
abilities, by the author's own admission, is its strong dependence on the ability to
obedience and command execution, for example, for working or working dogs, and a weak connection
with understanding and creativity, for example, hunting dogs. As a result, some breeds rank lower on the
list because of their stubborn or independent nature, which does not make them weakly intelligent
or untrainable. Tendency to bark.

Among other things, breeds differ in the level
of noise, or rather, in the frequency of their barking. Some breeds can bark all the time without
stopping and never get tired of barking at every stranger or strange dog that passes
by your house or by herself, other breeds bark only on business, when it is necessary
in her opinion, and still others can only give a voice in exceptional cases. Borzoi belongs to the third group described
above.

This breed will definitely not bother you
and your neighbors with unreasonable barking. But these dogs are not deprived of the desire
to gnaw. The desire to gnaw and taste everything is
common to puppies of all breeds, but as adults, different breeds have varying degrees of propensity
to explore the world with their teeth. Borzoi has a penchant for such pranks. However, this figure is not the highest in
greyhounds among all breeds. Activity and energy level. According to the level of charge and activity,
breeds can also be divided into active and calm or even lazy. An active dog will require constant walks,
training and frequent mental stimulation from you. Calm and less energetic dogs will be happy
with short walks around the house and will gladly share your desire to lie on the couch
at home.

This feature should be taken into account
when choosing a pet, since the unfulfilled needs of an active animal will be realized
at home on the things and objects of your home. The amount of energy in the dog also determines
with what desire and for how long the dog will play games with you or with your child
under your supervision. Borzoi is an active dog breed. In addition, many breeds have an innate desire
to chase moving objects and animals, the degree of this desire may vary from breed to breed. If this innate instinct is highly developed
in a dog, you need to carefully monitor the pet during a walk and keep it on a leash,
since any moving object can provoke the dog to chase, even if it is a car that can harm
the animal, at such moments the dog can disobey the call of the owner and switch all your
attention to the moving target.

In addition, such breeds pose an additional
danger to small domestic animals and birds. In the Russian Borzoi, this instinct is developed
as strongly as possible, this should be borne in mind when walking with your pet. Passion for vagrancy and love of freedom. Some breeds have a tendency to cover long
distances on their fours, for which they were bred, so these dogs, following their instinct,
will not miss the opportunity to escape from you and run a couple of kilometers, despite
your calls. Sled dogs, hounds and bloodhounds are mainly
inclined to such walks. Borzoi is just the case when the dog is waiting
for the moment when it will be possible to realize his instincts to run. Tendency to drool. A big plus of the breed for many owners is
low salivation.

The amount of saliva produced depends on the
characteristics of the breed. Some breeds salivate so much that they can
leave marks on the carpet, on the sofa, on the floor and on you, other breeds also salivate,
but this happens in much less quantities. Luckily, Borzoi produces very little saliva. The amount of dog hair in your home and on
your clothes depends a lot on what breed you choose, some breeds shed all year round, others
only seasonally, others hardly shed. This characteristic of the breed can be important
depending on where you plan to keep a pet, whether members of your family are allergic
to animal hair, and how important it is to you in general. Borzoi sheds a lot. Dog care. Some breeds may require a lot of grooming
and attention due to coat characteristics, muzzle shape, habitat, or the general health
of the breed. The Borzoi will require a bit more attention
than many other breeds due to the nature of the coat. General health of the breed on a 10-point
scale. The general health of dogs of this breed and
the possibility of the appearance of genetic diseases in them can be assessed on a ten-point
scale of 9 points, that is, they are quite healthy dogs with a minimum number of genetically
predisposed diseases.

The average life expectancy of the Russian
Borzoi is 10 to 13 years..

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